I'm Jojo Pasion Malig. I'm the usual suspect behind the night desk of the Philippines' leading news website. I like making interactive data eye candy. Mild prescriptivist.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

Nieman Lab remixes Fox News headlines, New York Times style, as an experiment on how people perceive media bias. 

Jonathan Stray asks:

Does this mean that we judge “bias” by brand, not content?

Stray’s takeaways:

The first defense against accusations of bias is to report fairly. But the hostile media effect pretty much guarantees that some stories are going to be hated by just about everyone, no matter how they’re written. I suppose this is no surprise for any journalist who reads the comments section, but it has implications for how news organizations might respond to such accusations.

This research also suggests that the longstanding practice of journalists hiding their personal affiliations might actually be effective at reducing perceived bias. But only up to a point: To avoid charges of bias, the audience needs to be able to see the journalist as fundamentally one of them. This might require getting closer to the audience, not hiding from them.

The New York Times is still using what its senor software architect called as "mullets of the Internet"?
Oh, the humanity.
A superb piece from Guardian Datablog/Datastore editor Simon Rogers on the infographics snobbery in the dataviz field:

"[I]t must be challenging for people who have spent years in design school to have some punk waltz in with a bit of nouse and illustrator on their machine to produce stuff that people, y’know, like."

More from Simon.

The New York Times is still using what its senor software architect called as "mullets of the Internet"?

Oh, the humanity.

A superb piece from Guardian Datablog/Datastore editor Simon Rogers on the infographics snobbery in the dataviz field:

"[I]t must be challenging for people who have spent years in design school to have some punk waltz in with a bit of nouse and illustrator on their machine to produce stuff that people, y’know, like."

More from Simon.

Reblogged from soupsoup  86 notes

And Bill Keller should understand that, at its best, Twitter is not a broadcast medium but a medium of conversation. What he has done so far on Twitter is the equivalent of walking into a party and saying a provocative sentence, followed by sitting at the corner sipping his cocktail – as in “#twittermakesyoustupid. Discuss.” Social encounters are satisfying and worth mostly to the degree that one participates in conversations, rather than announces witticisms and withdraws. Yes, I am a professor but I do not walk into random rooms and expect people to quietly take notes on what I am saying while I launch into a speech, projecting my voice to the back of the room. Keller cannot understand this medium if he treats it as something different than what it is, and to understand requires participation in its indigenous form, conversation. By Zeynep Tufekci (via soupsoup)

Reblogged from alexleo  979 notes

The 4 Kinds of NYT Headlines

alexleo:

While you can count on every HuffPost headline starting with WATCH or PHOTOS and every NY Post screamer being a pun your grandfather would have found hilarious, the Times has its own headline ruts that seem to have gotten deeper over the years. Here are the four most common kinds…

1) The Equivocators: These headlines present a hypothesis, but then get squirrely about going out on a limb and cover their bases. The two most common manifestations are “Something can be good, but also bad” and “Something is new, but also old.” Whatever form they take, these titles always remind me of the “Simpsons” Halloween episode in which an evil alien presidential candidate proclaims “Abortions for some, miniature American flags for others.”

2) The Maureen Dowd: These are easy to write. Simply mush together a bunch of slangy, pop-culture references into a semi-sensical pseudo-sentence that vaguely reminds you of a commercial jingle or movie title from the latter half of the 20th century.

3) The Kind that Smugly Give You No Information Whatsoever: These are the oddest of the bunch: The ones that make searching for and finding the story virtually impossible. I know the Times would never deign to have an SEO strategy, but some people read things on the Internet—say via Twitter or RSS—neither of which offer enough context to explain these cryptic titles (which often seem like they were written by a drunk Garison Keillor). Proper nouns, while not allowed in Scrabble, are admissible in headlines.

4) The “Here’s a Question We’re Not Going to Answer”: These usually show up in the health section—an area where people go to look for answers but find few. While less sinister than the question marks used in chyrons to imply slanderous falsehoods, these are simply a tool to let the author write about a subject with no real answer. They are annoying, especially because you want the first word of the article to be “yes” or “no” but it’s always “maybe” or “I don’t know.”


 

Reblogged from soupsoup  58 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Nick Kristof on Story Telling & Development

New York Times columnist Nick Kristof visits the Center for Global Development to talk about his reporting, his recent book and how he tries to use both to draw attention to issues in the developing world.

Run Time: ~20:00 | Download (Right / CRTL Click)

  • Track: Center for Global Development
  • Artist: Nick Kristof on Story Telling & Development
  • Plays: 330

A natural profit motive therefore flows out of this identity: it is by claiming “originality” that Keller gets to call Huffington a pirate (and justify the Times paywall), and it is by demonstrating his feet of clay that Huffington gets to defend her product from that accusation. Whoever wins the Real Journalism battle royal gets to defend American democracy from the barbarians. By

zunguzungu, Why Arianna Huffington is Bill Keller’s Somali Pirate

On bearing witness

"Bearing witness is often a far more effective way of saving lives than helping in more direct ways," says The New York Times’ Nicholas Kristof on the age-old question on whether journalists should drop their cameras and iPhones to help people in need.

Although each situation is unique and there are moments when journalists have to go beyond the call of duty to help someone directly, I still adhere to ethical rule that journalists should not get personally involved with their subjects.

I had a debate on Twitter not too long ago with someone not from the journalism industry (an entertainment TV show director!) who insisted that journalists should go beyond mere reportage, comparing us to - in his own words - Spiderman who has great responsibility to go along with his great powers.

My reply? Journalists are not superheroes.

Our immediate responsibility is to the news organizations that employ us. Our responsibility to our audience is to relay information to them accurately, clearly, quickly, and as objectively as possible.

Some of you may agree while some may not — arguing that media’s unique access to the hallways of power, people, places, and an audience willing to listen — allows it to be a supra-entity that knows no boundaries.

I say it again - we are not superheroes.

In the Philippine sociopolitical and economic setting, I understand why ordinary people seek journalists’ help amid the perceived failure of some government agencies to meet their needs. 

I agree too with the idea that journalists need advocacies to give meaning to their chosen profession.

However, may I point out that most journalists do not have professional training in social work, criminology, or even emergency rescue.

We have mass communication and journalism as our foundation. That is our strength.

A journalist playing the role of a crimebusting cop may send an innocent man to jail. A journalist thinking of himself or herself as a savior of the poor, at best, may only promote mendicancy and dependence on charity.

A journalist as an emergency rescuer who drops his notes to try to save the life of someone in an accident? He or she may do more harm than good if he tries to move the injured man.

We are the storytellers, not the actors and actresses in the story.