I'm Jojo Pasion Malig. I'm the usual suspect behind the night desk of the Philippines' leading news website. I like making interactive data eye candy. Mild prescriptivist.
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futurejournalismproject:

Omnishambles
The Oxford English Dictionary’s 2012 word of the year is “omnishambles”.

Although omnishambles is still most commonly used in political contexts, usage has evolved rapidly in other contexts to describe any debacle or poorly managed situation. Omnishambles, derived from omni- (‘all’) and shambles (‘a state of total disorder’), has given rise to its own derivative, omnishambolic, indicating that potentially this is a word with staying power.

The OED’s US counterpart, the Oxford American Dictionary, has chosen “GIF” as its word of the year.
Takeaway: The English are pessimistic while Americans are optimistically distracted by kittehs.

futurejournalismproject:

Omnishambles

The Oxford English Dictionary’s 2012 word of the year is “omnishambles”.

Although omnishambles is still most commonly used in political contexts, usage has evolved rapidly in other contexts to describe any debacle or poorly managed situation. Omnishambles, derived from omni- (‘all’) and shambles (‘a state of total disorder’), has given rise to its own derivative, omnishambolic, indicating that potentially this is a word with staying power.

The OED’s US counterpart, the Oxford American Dictionary, has chosen “GIF” as its word of the year.

Takeaway: The English are pessimistic while Americans are optimistically distracted by kittehs.

Reblogged from theatlantic  196 notes
theatlantic:

Why ‘Diphthong’ is the Best Word Ever

Ted McCagg is a creative director in advertising in Portland, Oregon. In his spare time, for the past five years or so, McCagg has been keeping a blog,”Questionable Skills” — the content of which consists almost entirely of drawings, some of them the bracket-style rankings that are a familiar feature of March Madness.
A few months ago, McCagg began using his blog and his bracket system to answer a question: What is the best word ever? Not the funniest word or the most erudite word or the most whimsical word … but The Best Word, full stop. What if, you know, the scallawag could eke out a thingamajig that would help him select the least milquetoast morsel from our linguistic smorgasbord? 
Yesterday, McCagg has answered his question.

Read more. [Image: Ted McCagg]

theatlantic:

Why ‘Diphthong’ is the Best Word Ever

Ted McCagg is a creative director in advertising in Portland, Oregon. In his spare time, for the past five years or so, McCagg has been keeping a blog,”Questionable Skills” — the content of which consists almost entirely of drawings, some of them the bracket-style rankings that are a familiar feature of March Madness.

A few months ago, McCagg began using his blog and his bracket system to answer a question: What is the best word ever? Not the funniest word or the most erudite word or the most whimsical word … but The Best Word, full stop. What if, you know, the scallawag could eke out a thingamajig that would help him select the least milquetoast morsel from our linguistic smorgasbord? 

Yesterday, McCagg has answered his question.

Read more. [Image: Ted McCagg]

Al Jazeera English’s Jamela Alindogan reports on what’s being done to keep the Philippines’ more than 170 languages alive.

Here’s also an explainer I made on the difference between a language and dialect.

Cebuano, Ilokano, Hiligaynon, Bikol, Waray-Waray, Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Maranao, Kinaray-a, Tausug, Maguindanaoan are languages.

Batangan Tagalog (Tagalog variant spoken in Batangas province) is a dialect of the Tagalog language.

The problem with the dash—as you may have noticed!—is that it discourages truly efficient writing. It also—and this might be its worst sin—disrupts the flow of a sentence. Don’t you find it annoying—and you can tell me if you do, I won’t be hurt—when a writer inserts a thought into the midst of another one that’s not yet complete? By

— Noreen Malone, making a case on Slate against the overuse of the em dash, that rebel of the punctuation pantheon that allows a writer to insert a stray piece of information or jump cut from one thought to another.

Seconded.

(via markcoatney)