I'm Jojo Pasion Malig. I'm the usual suspect behind the night desk of the Philippines' leading news website. I like making interactive data eye candy. Mild prescriptivist.
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futurejournalismproject:

A Library Grows in Manila
Via the BBC:

If you put all the books you own on the street outside your house, you might expect them to disappear in a trice. But one man in Manila tried it - and found that his collection grew.
Hernando Guanlao is a sprightly man in his early 60s, with one abiding passion - books.
They’re his pride and joy, which is just as well because, whether he likes it or not, they seem to be taking over his house.
Guanlao, known by his nickname Nanie, has set up an informal library outside his home in central Manila, to encourage his local community to share his joy of reading.
The idea is simple. Readers can take as many books as they want, for as long as they want - even permanently. As Guanlao says: “The only rule is that there are no rules.”
It’s a policy you might assume would end very quickly - with Guanlao having no books at all.
But in fact, in the 12 years he’s been running his library - or, in his words, his book club - he’s found that his collection has grown rather than diminished, as more and more people donate to the cause.
“It seems to me that the books are speaking to me. That’s why it multiplies like that,” he says with a smile. “The books are telling me they want to be read… they want to be passed around.”

BBC, The man who turned his home into a public library.

futurejournalismproject:

A Library Grows in Manila

Via the BBC:

If you put all the books you own on the street outside your house, you might expect them to disappear in a trice. But one man in Manila tried it - and found that his collection grew.

Hernando Guanlao is a sprightly man in his early 60s, with one abiding passion - books.

They’re his pride and joy, which is just as well because, whether he likes it or not, they seem to be taking over his house.

Guanlao, known by his nickname Nanie, has set up an informal library outside his home in central Manila, to encourage his local community to share his joy of reading.

The idea is simple. Readers can take as many books as they want, for as long as they want - even permanently. As Guanlao says: “The only rule is that there are no rules.”

It’s a policy you might assume would end very quickly - with Guanlao having no books at all.

But in fact, in the 12 years he’s been running his library - or, in his words, his book club - he’s found that his collection has grown rather than diminished, as more and more people donate to the cause.

“It seems to me that the books are speaking to me. That’s why it multiplies like that,” he says with a smile. “The books are telling me they want to be read… they want to be passed around.”

BBC, The man who turned his home into a public library.

Reblogged from theatlantic  3,490 notes

theatlantic:

In Focus: Monsoon Rain Floods Manila 

The capital city of the Philippines has been drenched by heavy, deadly rainfall for 11 days now, beginning with the arrival of Typhoon Saola last week, leading to mudslides and extensive flooding. About 60 percent of Manila is currently flooded, and authorities are reporting 72 deaths so far. Nearly 850,000 remain stranded or displaced, as residents wait for a break in the downpour, predicted to begin on Thursday. 

See more. [Images: Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images, AP Photo/Aaron Favila, Jay Directo/AFP/Getty Images]

Reblogged from abscbnnews  11 notes
abscbnnews:

GARBAGE PILES UP ON ROXAS BOULEVARD SEAWALLPhoto by Rem Zamora for ABS-CBNnews.comMetro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) personnel walk on top of garbage that piled up on the seawall of Roxas Boulevard in Manila on Wednesday. Strong waves generated by typhoon “Gener” flooded a portion of the boulevard and washed tons of debris ashore. 

Storm surge + lowered wave deflector + lots of garbage = this.

abscbnnews:

GARBAGE PILES UP ON ROXAS BOULEVARD SEAWALL
Photo by Rem Zamora for ABS-CBNnews.com

Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) personnel walk on top of garbage that piled up on the seawall of Roxas Boulevard in Manila on Wednesday. Strong waves generated by typhoon “Gener” flooded a portion of the boulevard and washed tons of debris ashore. 

Storm surge + lowered wave deflector + lots of garbage = this.

Manila’s Gory, Sexy Tabloids Outsell Traditional Broadsheets
The New York Times’ Floyd Whaley writes:

With names like Bulgar — the Filipino word for “vulgar” — and Police Files Tonite, more than 40 Manila newspapers publish in both the format and spirit of classic tabloid journalism. They offer readers a dizzying assortment of sex, violence, gore, celebrity scandal, strange news, spirited opinion and personal advice.
A quick scan through the Manila tabloids shows a victim of a motorcycle accident, whose head has been severed, lying in a pool of blood on the pavement with no attempt by the publication to mask the gore. Photos of scantily clad men and women, and some photos of completely nude women, sit alongside columns by priests, senior government officials and mayors.
Hard-hitting columnists link government officials and police officers by name to extortion and bribery, a practice not without risk in a country with one of the world’s highest rates of murdered journalists. One publication regularly features a cartoon cockroach that can be spotted throughout the pages making clever commentary on stories and photos.

The Copy Editor: Tocino is cured meat. You get the idea.

Manila’s Gory, Sexy Tabloids Outsell Traditional Broadsheets

The New York Times’ Floyd Whaley writes:

With names like Bulgar — the Filipino word for “vulgar” — and Police Files Tonite, more than 40 Manila newspapers publish in both the format and spirit of classic tabloid journalism. They offer readers a dizzying assortment of sex, violence, gore, celebrity scandal, strange news, spirited opinion and personal advice.

A quick scan through the Manila tabloids shows a victim of a motorcycle accident, whose head has been severed, lying in a pool of blood on the pavement with no attempt by the publication to mask the gore. Photos of scantily clad men and women, and some photos of completely nude women, sit alongside columns by priests, senior government officials and mayors.

Hard-hitting columnists link government officials and police officers by name to extortion and bribery, a practice not without risk in a country with one of the world’s highest rates of murdered journalists. One publication regularly features a cartoon cockroach that can be spotted throughout the pages making clever commentary on stories and photos.

The Copy Editor: Tocino is cured meat. You get the idea.

North Korean nuke bomb meets Recto
For dystopian data visualization Tuesday, here’s what happens if you drop a 6-kiloton North Korean nuclear bomb right in the heart of Recto in Manila.
A large fireball will instantly fry a portion of a barangay on ground zero.
People on Avenida and Ongpin will then get blown away by an air blast.
Radiation will reach Tutuban, Lawton and Quiapo.
Finally, a heat blast will decimate Mendiola, Lyceum, Intramuros, Tondo, TIP, the Comelec, the Office of the Ombudsman — but will miss Malacañang.
[via Alex Wellerstein’s Nuke Map]

North Korean nuke bomb meets Recto

For dystopian data visualization Tuesday, here’s what happens if you drop a 6-kiloton North Korean nuclear bomb right in the heart of Recto in Manila.

A large fireball will instantly fry a portion of a barangay on ground zero.

People on Avenida and Ongpin will then get blown away by an air blast.

Radiation will reach Tutuban, Lawton and Quiapo.

Finally, a heat blast will decimate Mendiola, Lyceum, Intramuros, Tondo, TIP, the Comelec, the Office of the Ombudsman — but will miss Malacañang.

[via Alex Wellerstein’s Nuke Map]

Interactive heat map: Counting the cost of Typhoon Pedring

Typhoon Pedring (international name Nesat), which struck the Philippines Tuesday morning, has now killed at least 48 people and left 30 others missing.

It has either displaced or directly affected more than 1.3 million people, according to civil defense officials.

The typhoon also damaged properties, including farmlands, amounting to more than P4 billion, according to latest estimates from the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

Click, zoom, and scroll through on the interactive Google map to survey the damage left behind by the typhoon.

The darker the red, the more people that the typhoon directly affected.

Data source: NDRRMC as of 6pm, September 30, 2011. Data visualization via Google Fusion Tables.

Reblogged from flyingjeepney  42 notes
flyingjeepney:

The harbor at Blue Hour
Harbor Square
Manila, Philippines
[via jdeepan]

Just a few blocks away from where I live. Harbor Square is just behind the Cultural Center of the Philippines grounds.
I go here on foot if I’m with my wife and our 2 boys, or on the scooter if I’m on my own.  
Shops and restos are a bit upscale but if you’re looking to nurse a bottle of brew on a weekday, there’s an open-air pub in the area to the right of the main square.  

flyingjeepney:

The harbor at Blue Hour

Harbor Square

Manila, Philippines

[via jdeepan]

Just a few blocks away from where I live. Harbor Square is just behind the Cultural Center of the Philippines grounds.

I go here on foot if I’m with my wife and our 2 boys, or on the scooter if I’m on my own.  

Shops and restos are a bit upscale but if you’re looking to nurse a bottle of brew on a weekday, there’s an open-air pub in the area to the right of the main square.  

Reblogged from abscbnnews  26 notes
abscbnnews:

 
 
Philippines not ready for quake disaster: experts
The Philippine capital is woefully unprepared for a major quake that could hit at any time and kill tens of thousands of people, flattening nearly half the city’s homes, experts warn. [ Read full story  ]
*Map shows distribution of active faults in Metro Manila
Visit abs-cbnNEWS.com to view Phivolcs maps of Metro Manila fault zones in detail and download the PDF files.

abscbnnews:

Philippines not ready for quake disaster: experts

The Philippine capital is woefully unprepared for a major quake that could hit at any time and kill tens of thousands of people, flattening nearly half the city’s homes, experts warn. [ Read full story  ]

*Map shows distribution of active faults in Metro Manila

Visit abs-cbnNEWS.com to view Phivolcs maps of Metro Manila fault zones in detail and download the PDF files.