I'm Jojo Pasion Malig. I'm the usual suspect behind the night desk of the Philippines' leading news website. I like making interactive data eye candy. Mild prescriptivist.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from thebroadcaster  7 notes

thebroadcaster:

Post Rapture. An interesting TEDTalk on why people believe in strange things

Why do people see the Virgin Mary on cheese sandwiches or hear demonic lyrics in “Stairway to Heaven”? Using video, images and music, professional skeptic Michael Shermer explores these and other phenomena, including UFOs and alien sightings. He offers cognitive context: In the absence of sound science, incomplete information can combine with the power of suggestion (helping us hear those Satanic lyrics in Led Zeppelin).

In fact, he says, humans tend to convince ourselves to believe: We overvalue the “hits” that support our beliefs, and discount the more numerous “misses.”

Reblogged from theeconomist  40 notes

Those opposed to METI argue that broadcasting signals into space announcing the location of Earth is tantamount to ringing a dinner gong for any carnivorous, colonising or anti-social aliens who might be listening. Although Earth would be a rather long way to go for lunch, some argue that the decision to take such a risk is not one for a handful of scientists. By

Astronomers are debating if some stones are better left unturned. 

Chemistry Nobel winner via Quezon City

 

American Richard Heck and his Filipino wife Socorro, kiss during an interview with the Associated Press at their residence at Manila’s Quezon city in the Philippines shortly after The Royal Academy of Sciences announced in Sweden he won the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Wednesday Oct.6, 2010. Heck, a long-time resident in the Philippines and married to a Filipino, and Japanese researchers Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki won the Nobel Prize for developing a chemical method that has allowed scientists to test cancer drugs and make thinner computer screens. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

WASHINGTON - US professor Richard Heck said Wednesday he was thrilled to receive the Nobel prize for chemistry but acknowledged the discovery he made was now well beyond him as companies and labs harness its uses, often in secret.

"I’m very pleased to receive the prize," Heck, an emeritus professor at the University of Delaware, told AFP when reached by telephone in the Philippines, where he said dozens of people had gathered to congratulate him.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which awards the Nobels, had called him there earlier Wednesday to inform him he had won the prize, and Heck said he was not entirely caught off guard.

"It’s always been in the back of my mind," he said. "People have told me it was worthy of a Nobel prize, so I wasn’t totally surprised, but yes I was very happy to get it."

Heck, 79, is among three professors sharing the 2010 Nobel prize for the development of a chemical reaction that bears his name — a sophisticated tool that has helped revolutionize several industries. [Agence France-Presse/ABS-CBN News]

"If a hero is only as good as his opponent, then the creation of the Joker cannot be underestimated. ‘Villains, I always thought, were more interesting,’ Mr. Robinson said. He learned from his studies that some characters were built on their contradictions, so he decided that his evildoer would have a sense of humor."
- The New York Times, The Joker in the Deck: Birth of a Supervillain
Related articles by Zemanta
Michael Jones on heroes, villains and the science of narrative (niemanstoryboard.us)
Joker’s Birth Anchors Bio of Batman Artist Jerry Robinson (wired.com)
Crazy, Sentimental & Old Superheroes and Supervillains by Donald Soffritti (planetoddity.com)
Dastardly plan, anyone? (mmosh.wordpress.com)
"Origins": The explosive new science of pregnancy (salon.com)
DC Universe Online Developers Answer Fan Questions (escapistmagazine.com)
Cinematical’s Heroes vs. Villains Tournament - Round 1 (Vote Now!) (moviefone.com)

"If a hero is only as good as his opponent, then the creation of the Joker cannot be underestimated. ‘Villains, I always thought, were more interesting,’ Mr. Robinson said. He learned from his studies that some characters were built on their contradictions, so he decided that his evildoer would have a sense of humor."

- The New York Times, The Joker in the Deck: Birth of a Supervillain

At some point in the last decade PowerPoint developed a toxic reputation. The military is obsessed (and concerned) about it, business peoplegrumble about it, and its tendency towards simplification has been shown to be dangerous. But online they’ve become downright passé.

We are now living in the age of the online whiteboard presentation.

[more on PBS Need To Know]