I'm Jojo Pasion Malig. I'm the usual suspect behind the night desk of the Philippines' leading news website. I like making interactive data eye candy. Mild prescriptivist.
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Reblogged from ricasia  20 notes
pinoyfoods:

Balut - It is a duck’s embryo still in shell. It can be paired with vinegar or with plain salt.. It’s an egg with a chick inside, a partially formed egg yolk and a hard piece of egg white. The unhatched could either be 16 days or 18 days… ^^ the best way to introduce foreigners in the philippines.. haha,it doesnt look so good but its definitely delicious..

Totally random poll: With salt or vinegar?

pinoyfoods:

Balut - It is a duck’s embryo still in shell. It can be paired with vinegar or with plain salt.. It’s an egg with a chick inside, a partially formed egg yolk and a hard piece of egg white. The unhatched could either be 16 days or 18 days… ^^ the best way to introduce foreigners in the philippines.. haha,it doesnt look so good but its definitely delicious..

Totally random poll: With salt or vinegar?

Reblogged from flyingjeepney  81 notes
flyingjeepney:

EveryJuan, a hero: When blogger Jay Jaboneta learned about the daily plight of around 200 young children in Zamboanga who have to SWIM half a mile everyday just to get to school, he knew he had to help out somehow. Using Facebook as a simple platform, he encouraged his friends to pitch in the effort, and a few days later, support for their small campaign snowballed, eventually raising P70,000 in funds.
Today, the young children from Layag-Layag, Zamboanga no longer have to struggle daily to keep their bags and school uniforms above their heads to prevent these from getting wet. Their new school boat, named Bagong Pag-Asa or New Hope, brings them safely to their destination.
Watch the story here.
Everyday, thousands of Filipino children have to face arduous treks through mountains, jungles and rivers just to get a taste of education. And, everyday a number of ordinary, but impassioned Filipinos, try to make a difference: showcasing modern-day heroism is well within everyone’s capacity.

Learn more about Jay Jabonata, and Zamboanga Funds for Little Kids on Facebook, and maybe start your own campaign!

flyingjeepney:

EveryJuan, a hero: When blogger Jay Jaboneta learned about the daily plight of around 200 young children in Zamboanga who have to SWIM half a mile everyday just to get to school, he knew he had to help out somehow. Using Facebook as a simple platform, he encouraged his friends to pitch in the effort, and a few days later, support for their small campaign snowballed, eventually raising P70,000 in funds.

Today, the young children from Layag-Layag, Zamboanga no longer have to struggle daily to keep their bags and school uniforms above their heads to prevent these from getting wet. Their new school boat, named Bagong Pag-Asa or New Hope, brings them safely to their destination.

Watch the story here.

Everyday, thousands of Filipino children have to face arduous treks through mountains, jungles and rivers just to get a taste of education. And, everyday a number of ordinary, but impassioned Filipinos, try to make a difference: showcasing modern-day heroism is well within everyone’s capacity.

Zamboanga-Kids-logo.png (207×217)

Learn more about Jay Jabonata, and Zamboanga Funds for Little Kids on Facebook, and maybe start your own campaign!

Reblogged from flyingjeepney  165 notes
flyingjeepney:

Even heroes have fun
In this not-so-famous photo of distinguished men in our nation’s history, our national heroes seem to have drank a little too much wine. Trinidad H. Pardo de Tavera is seen on the floor unconscious, while the man seated at the back (middle) who happens to be Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo, has been joined by their waiter (right), also looking tipsy; and, Dr. Jose Rizal (standing) is “about to hurl an apple on the hapless Trinidad.” 
This is what they looked like before the party started.
Goes to show you though: even heroes are as human as we are. 
via mcoy

flyingjeepney:

Even heroes have fun

In this not-so-famous photo of distinguished men in our nation’s history, our national heroes seem to have drank a little too much wine. Trinidad H. Pardo de Tavera is seen on the floor unconscious, while the man seated at the back (middle) who happens to be Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo, has been joined by their waiter (right), also looking tipsy; and, Dr. Jose Rizal (standing) is “about to hurl an apple on the hapless Trinidad.” 

This is what they looked like before the party started.

Goes to show you though: even heroes are as human as we are. 

via mcoy

The Responsible Parenthood, Reproductive Health and Population and Development Act of 2011

The Responsible Parenthood, Reproductive Health and Population and Development Act of 2011 

[via blogwatch.ph]

Reblogged from kateoplis  379 notes

Tumblr and link attribution

kateoplis:

thepoliticalnotebook:

copyeditor:

I’m reading Anthony DeRosa’s post again on how some traditional media companies refuse to enter into the link economy.

The practice is also prevalent here in Tumblr, it seems.

Photos and articles are sometimes posted sans attribution or links to the sources. Other Tumblr users, meanwhile, delete the link pertaining to the original tumblelog that posted the material.

No. If it’s on the web, it’s not yours. You can’t pull out the fair-use-clause card if you don’t attribute or try to claim something that is not yours. Remember Krip?

Fellow Tumblrers: This is important.  I see this a lot, particularly when it comes to crediting photos.  The rule is, give as much credit as you know, and if you can’t find enough information to credit the photo, quote, or article, DON’T POST IT.  This isn’t something to be casual about.

This issue really bothers me. Yes, the photo posts are the majority of it but I see it happening in all kinds of posts: videos uploaded to Tumblr w/o links (Tumblr’s video upload is reserved for videos you’ve taken yourself, no?); text w/o block-quotes and sources, etc. It’s especially disheartening when it’s from “reputable” Tumblrs. 

From a Tumblr editor’s perspective, I cannot promote a post without proper link to the source, per Tumblr’s Editor Guidelines, and I refuse to reblog one based on the same criteria. Please take the extra minute and credit.

Tumblr and link attribution

I’m reading Anthony DeRosa’s post again on how some traditional media companies refuse to enter into the link economy.

The practice is also prevalent here in Tumblr, it seems.

Photos and articles are sometimes posted sans attribution or links to the sources.

Other Tumblr users, meanwhile, delete the link to the original tumblelog that posted the material.

No. If it’s on the web, it’s not yours. You can’t pull out the fair-use-clause card if you don’t attribute or you try to claim something that is not yours.

Remember Krip?

Reblogged from flyingjeepney  42 notes
flyingjeepney:

The harbor at Blue Hour
Harbor Square
Manila, Philippines
[via jdeepan]

Just a few blocks away from where I live. Harbor Square is just behind the Cultural Center of the Philippines grounds.
I go here on foot if I’m with my wife and our 2 boys, or on the scooter if I’m on my own.  
Shops and restos are a bit upscale but if you’re looking to nurse a bottle of brew on a weekday, there’s an open-air pub in the area to the right of the main square.  

flyingjeepney:

The harbor at Blue Hour

Harbor Square

Manila, Philippines

[via jdeepan]

Just a few blocks away from where I live. Harbor Square is just behind the Cultural Center of the Philippines grounds.

I go here on foot if I’m with my wife and our 2 boys, or on the scooter if I’m on my own.  

Shops and restos are a bit upscale but if you’re looking to nurse a bottle of brew on a weekday, there’s an open-air pub in the area to the right of the main square.  

It was the middle of the day in the steamy Philippine jungle and the sun was merciless. Director Francis Ford Coppola, dressed in rumpled white Mao pajamas, was slowly making his way upriver in a motor launch. “Right here is where we hang the dead body,” he said to his production designer, Dean Tavoularis. “I want skulls – a pile, no, a wall of skulls.” “Can we light this for night?” he asked his director of photography, Vittorio Storaro. Storaro sighed and stroked his beard. “Fires should be burning behind the curtain,” Coppola said to Tavoularis, pointing to a striking red silk curtain that meandered 300 yards along the riverbank. When the boat docked, a set decorator complained, “Where are we going to get 200 skulls?” Tavoularis shrugged. After what he and everyone else had been through, 200 skulls were just so many coconuts. By

Maureen Orth, On the Set of Apocalypse Now. In the jungle with Francis Ford Coppola (Newsweek 1977)